Difference between revisions of "Using dotISO Files"

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{|border="1" align="center" style="text-align:center;"
 
{|border="1" align="center" style="text-align:center;"
|<span style="color:#004700; background:#d0c9cc">'''Correct procedure is to use a special option in the burner software to "burn CD ISO image" or "burn DVD ISO image". Popular burner software Nero and Deepburner have this option. If in doubt, get the product</span> ftp://terabyteunlimited.com/burncdcc.zip<span style="color:#004700; background:#d0c9cc">and install that. It makes the operation foolproof, because its ''only'' function is to burn ISO images to CD/DVD.
+
|<span style="color:#004700; background:#d0c9cc">'''Correct procedure is to use a special option in the burner software to "burn CD ISO image" or "burn DVD ISO image".
  +
</span>
----
 
  +
|}
<span style="color:#004700; background:#d0c9cc">'''In Windows 7, locate the ISO file in Windows Explorer and right-click it. You will get various options - click on 'Open with' then choose 'Windows Disc Image Burner' to produce a bootable CD/DVD. To be prudent, tick the 'Verify disc after burning' box'''.</span>
 
  +
==== Windows 7 ====
  +
#via Windows Explorer is the simplest procedure for beginners
  +
#*locate the ISO file in Windows Explorer and right-click it. You will get various options
  +
#*click on 'Open with' then choose 'Windows Disc Image Burner' to produce a bootable CD/DVD
  +
#*to be prudent, tick the 'Verify disc after burning' box'''
  +
#popular burner software Nero has a similar option. Detailed procedure is available at the following site: http://partedmagic.com/doku.php?id=creating_the_livecd_with_nero
  +
#*simply select your dotISO file in lieu of partedmagic.iso
  +
#if none of the above options are available get the product ftp://terabyteunlimited.com/burncdcc.zip and install that
  +
  +
{|border="1" align="center" style="text-align:center;"�
  +
|<span style="color:#004700; background:#d0c9cc">'''It makes the operation foolproof, because its ''only'' function is to burn ISO images to CD/DVD'''
 
|}
 
|}
  +
==== Other OS ====
  +
#most Linux will include CD/DVD burning software such as k3b, XFreeBurn etc, which include the function to "burn CD ISO image"
   
   
  +
==== Choice of Optical Media ====
dotISO images that are smaller than 700 MB may be burnt to DVD media (most burner software will cope with this). Doing so is likely to result in the media reading somewhat faster than would be the case with CD media and this can be advantageous for the uses described above.
 
  +
#dotISO disks must be "bit-perfect"
  +
#*avoid using cheap media blanks that are sold primarily for audio/video use
  +
#*setting a slower burn speed might produce more reliable results when using untested burner/media combination
  +
#dotISO images that are smaller than 700 MB may be burnt to DVD media
  +
#*most burner software will cope with this
  +
#*doing so is likely to result in the media reading somewhat faster than would be the case with CD media and this can be advantageous for the uses described above.
  +
#dotISO images >700 MB but << a full DVD of 4.3 GB will often be encountered
  +
#*these must be burned to DVD media
  +
#dotISO images > a full DVD size of 4.3 GB are occassionally encountered
  +
#*these can be burned only to '''dual-layer''' DVD media
  +
#*such media is relatively expensive and
  +
#*not all releases of burner software handle it reliably
  +
#avoid burning dotISO to 80 mm diameter mini-CD/DVD
  +
#*from which the read process would be relatively slow
  +
#*not all releases of burner software handle it reliably
  +
 
=== Writing Bootable USB/SD ===
 
=== Writing Bootable USB/SD ===
  +
  +
==== Caution re SD Cards ====
  +
According to Wikipedia, SD cards contain areas that should '''NOT''' be reformatted. The SD Card Consortium provides an App "SD Formater" for safe re-formatting of SD cards
  +
  +
The routines commonly used to produce '''bootable''' SD cards (mostly for Linux but also DOS systems for Firmware upgrades) might overwrite these areas. Experience has shown that:
  +
*bootable SD media perform the intended task well (although speed would depend on class of card)
  +
*SD cards that are to then be used for second or subsequent bootable images require special pre-treatment - See "Strictly for Geeks" below
  +
  +
SD cards that are later reverted from use as bootable media to use for general storage might perform poorly in the latter application
  +
 
==== Writing ISO Files ====
 
==== Writing ISO Files ====
#this method is relatively safe for Windows users only
+
#this method is relatively safe for Linux & Windows users
  +
#*it should suceed with all dotISO files, provided that those are bootable images
#*other users see
 
#*it shoulc suceed with all dotISO files, provided that those are bootable images
 
 
#obtain and install a suitable program
 
#obtain and install a suitable program
#*unetbootin is one of the better known
+
#*unetbootin is now deprecated
  +
#*Linux users install instead packge Imagewriter
  +
#*Windows users obtain instead SUSE Studio Imagewriter https://github.com/downloads/openSUSE/kiwi/ImageWriter.exe
 
#ensure that the USB/SD media to be used is formatted '''FAT 32'''
 
#ensure that the USB/SD media to be used is formatted '''FAT 32'''
 
#as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
 
#as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
 
#*including scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
 
#*including scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
#launch unetbootin
+
#launch Imagewriter
 
#*locate the downloaded dotISO file on hard disk
 
#*locate the downloaded dotISO file on hard disk
 
#*select the USB/SD media to be written
 
#*select the USB/SD media to be written
 
#*click ''' OK'''
 
#*click ''' OK'''
  +
 
== Getting Technical ==
 
== Getting Technical ==
 
'''non Windows users''' README
 
'''non Windows users''' README
Line 50: Line 91:
 
|<span style="color:red; background:#d0c9cc">'''Linux users need to execise great caution with the this procedure - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten'''</span>
 
|<span style="color:red; background:#d0c9cc">'''Linux users need to execise great caution with the this procedure - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten'''</span>
 
|}
 
|}
  +
Linux users can use the command
   
  +
<nowiki># lsblk</nowiki>
Cross-check which removable device is to be written by examining the manufacturer ID, partition size, filesystem type (FAT 32) reported by the Operating System
 
  +
  +
to cross check which storage devices are recognised
  +
  +
All users should cross-check which removable device is to be written by examining the manufacturer ID, partition size, filesystem type (FAT 32) reported by the Operating System
 
==== Writing ISO Files ====
 
==== Writing ISO Files ====
 
#this procedure can be achieved via GUI tools
 
#this procedure can be achieved via GUI tools
Line 64: Line 110:
 
#*select the USB/SD media to be written
 
#*select the USB/SD media to be written
 
#*click ''' OK'''
 
#*click ''' OK'''
  +
 
== Strictly for Geeks ==
 
== Strictly for Geeks ==
  +
=== Writing ISOhybrid Files ===
 
  +
#this task is for intermediate/advanced users
 
  +
=== SD Cards ===
#some dotISO files are now being provided as "ISOhybrids"
 
  +
If an SD card is to be '''re-used''' then the following preparation should be followed
#*these may be written to CD/DVD/USB/SD media, as above
 
  +
#attach the card to a Linux PC via a card reader
#*but require this alternative procedure to achive their main advamtage of typically booting much faster
 
  +
#use <nowiki># lsblk</nowiki>
#**because most OS use conservative settings to boot USB/SD devices, in order to cope with older/buggy BIOS
 
  +
#*to identify the device as sd(x)
  +
#run <nowiki># dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sd(x) bs=1M count=8</nowiki>
  +
#*to zero the first 8M
  +
#*this is the notional "first cylinder" used by Windows devices and to which they might store filesystem metadata
  +
  +
Experienced users tend to use "dd" to write ISO images to SD cards
  +
*SD cards use very large block sizes and will write slowly with the common 4 kiB block size
  +
*small block sizes might also cause unnecessary write cycle - the mortal enemy of flash memory devices
  +
  +
Therefore run
  +
<nowiki># dd if=<path to ISO image> of=/dev/sd(x) bs=4M </nowiki>
  +
*to write the image.
  +
  +
=== Using/Creating ISOhybrid Files ===
  +
This task is for intermediate/advanced users
  +
  +
==== Overview ====
  +
Some dotISO files are now being provided as "ISOhybrids"
  +
*which have the main advantage of typically booting much faster from USB/SD devices
  +
**because most OS use conservative settings to boot USB/SD devices, in order to cope with older/buggy BIOS
  +
*boot speed is also highly dependent on the "Class" of SD media and (probably) unstated/indeterminate grade of USB "thumbdrive"
  +
  +
ISOhybrids may also be burnt to conventional CD/DVD/Bluray optical media, or written to USB/SD media, as in general/intermediate procedures above
  +
*hence the "hybrid" descriptor
  +
*but require the alternative procedure below to achieve faster performance from USB/SD devices
  +
  +
==== Hybridisation ====
  +
#this procedure may be skipped, if the ISO is known to already be hybridised
 
#dotISO of unknown type may safely be converted to hybridISO via the program "isohybrid"
 
#dotISO of unknown type may safely be converted to hybridISO via the program "isohybrid"
  +
#*the conversion adds a few tens of kB, if the ISO is not already hybridised
#ensure that the USB/SD media to be used is formatted '''FAT 32'''
 
  +
#**which may push the ISO beyond the maximum capacity of optical media
  +
#**alhough these ISOhybrids could still be written to USB/SD media, as in intermediate procedures above, or advanced precedures following.
  +
#*it makes no perceptable difference if the ISO is already hybridised
  +
  +
  +
{|border="1" align="center" style="text-align:center;"
  +
|<span style="color:red; background:#d0c9cc">'''execise great caution with the following procedure - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten'''</span>
  +
|}
  +
  +
==== Writing ISOhybrids ====
 
#as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
 
#as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
#*including scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
+
#*including printers, scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
#launch a program for writing images of storage media eg
+
#**any of which could include "storage"
  +
#verify the drive letter/number of the USB/SD media
#*in Windows use "rawwrite"
 
#*in other OS use "dd"
+
#*in Windows use "Computer" menu and open the drive
  +
#*in other OS use "My Computer", hdparm, fdisk etc
  +
#*check by manufacturer ID, size, partitioning etc
  +
#the partitioning/format of the USB/SD media to be used is probably immaterial
  +
#*if in doubt, format the single/first partition as '''FAT 32'''
  +
#launch a program for direct writing disk images of storage media eg
  +
#*in Windows use http://www.softpedia.com/get/CD-DVD-Tools/Data-CD-DVD-Burning/Win32-Disk-Imager.shtml or "rawwrite"
  +
#*in other OS use "dd" (or preferably "ddrescue")
  +
#**in this procedure "dd" operates on an '''unmounted''' device
 
#more detailed instructions are at:
 
#more detailed instructions are at:
 
http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Live_USB_stick#Bootable_USB_from_DVD_or_Net-install
 
http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Live_USB_stick#Bootable_USB_from_DVD_or_Net-install
Line 86: Line 179:
   
 
==Booting from Media==
 
==Booting from Media==
  +
[[Booting from Removable Media]]
 
Booting from CD/DVD/USB/SD drives is disabled, by default, on many computers as a precaution against malware
 
#on modern PC it can be temporarily selected by pressing a key (usually F11, but sometimes F12) at boot
 
#*Then select the relevant drive from the menu presented.
 
#**"CDROM" for ''internal'' optical drive
 
#**"USB CDROM" for ''external'' optical drive
 
#**"USB CDROM" for USB drive written from standard dotISO
 
#**"USB HDD" for USB drive written from hybrid dotISO
 
#**"SD" for ''internal'' SD drive
 
#on modern PC it can be enabled persistently via CMOS setup and setting the above devices to '''ENABLED''' in the boot sequence
 
   
   

Latest revision as of 23:01, 19 March 2015

For General Users

Purpose

Files having the extension *.ISO may be new to some readers. These files are essentially an image of a CD, DVD (or BlueRay ?) optical media and usually images of bootable media. dotISO files may be downloaded, saved, copied to other disks/volumes/folders etc, exactly like any other file. However, they require special processing to achieve their usual purpose of producing a bootable media

  • originally dotISO were intended for CD/DVD media
  • the same files may now be made into bootable USB/SD media
    • this requires a different program to write the media

The bootable media are typically used for one of:

  • a "live" demonstration system - often based on Linux
  • running software for backing up systems and/or data
  • installing operating systems
  • "rescue" systems
those not familiar with operating systems need to execise caution with the last two

Burning Bootable CD/DVD

  1. this will be the simpest and most reliable approach for beginners
    • virtually any computer now in use can boot CD/DVD
    • most OS have suitable software for burning CD/DVD
  2. a common mistake made by novices is to use their favourite burner software to copy a *.ISO file to a blank CD/DVD - incorrect as explained at http://www.puppylinux.com/cd-puppy.htm
Correct procedure is to use a special option in the burner software to "burn CD ISO image" or "burn DVD ISO image".

Windows 7

  1. via Windows Explorer is the simplest procedure for beginners
    • locate the ISO file in Windows Explorer and right-click it. You will get various options
    • click on 'Open with' then choose 'Windows Disc Image Burner' to produce a bootable CD/DVD
    • to be prudent, tick the 'Verify disc after burning' box
  2. popular burner software Nero has a similar option. Detailed procedure is available at the following site: http://partedmagic.com/doku.php?id=creating_the_livecd_with_nero
    • simply select your dotISO file in lieu of partedmagic.iso
  3. if none of the above options are available get the product ftp://terabyteunlimited.com/burncdcc.zip and install that
It makes the operation foolproof, because its only function is to burn ISO images to CD/DVD

Other OS

  1. most Linux will include CD/DVD burning software such as k3b, XFreeBurn etc, which include the function to "burn CD ISO image"


Choice of Optical Media

  1. dotISO disks must be "bit-perfect"
    • avoid using cheap media blanks that are sold primarily for audio/video use
    • setting a slower burn speed might produce more reliable results when using untested burner/media combination
  2. dotISO images that are smaller than 700 MB may be burnt to DVD media
    • most burner software will cope with this
    • doing so is likely to result in the media reading somewhat faster than would be the case with CD media and this can be advantageous for the uses described above.
  3. dotISO images >700 MB but << a full DVD of 4.3 GB will often be encountered
    • these must be burned to DVD media
  4. dotISO images > a full DVD size of 4.3 GB are occassionally encountered
    • these can be burned only to dual-layer DVD media
    • such media is relatively expensive and
    • not all releases of burner software handle it reliably
  5. avoid burning dotISO to 80 mm diameter mini-CD/DVD
    • from which the read process would be relatively slow
    • not all releases of burner software handle it reliably

Writing Bootable USB/SD

Caution re SD Cards

According to Wikipedia, SD cards contain areas that should NOT be reformatted. The SD Card Consortium provides an App "SD Formater" for safe re-formatting of SD cards

The routines commonly used to produce bootable SD cards (mostly for Linux but also DOS systems for Firmware upgrades) might overwrite these areas. Experience has shown that:

  • bootable SD media perform the intended task well (although speed would depend on class of card)
  • SD cards that are to then be used for second or subsequent bootable images require special pre-treatment - See "Strictly for Geeks" below

SD cards that are later reverted from use as bootable media to use for general storage might perform poorly in the latter application

Writing ISO Files

  1. this method is relatively safe for Linux & Windows users
    • it should suceed with all dotISO files, provided that those are bootable images
  2. obtain and install a suitable program
  3. ensure that the USB/SD media to be used is formatted FAT 32
  4. as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
    • including scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
  5. launch Imagewriter
    • locate the downloaded dotISO file on hard disk
    • select the USB/SD media to be written
    • click OK

Getting Technical

non Windows users README

Writing Bootable USB/SD

Linux users need to execise great caution with the this procedure - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten

Linux users can use the command

# lsblk

to cross check which storage devices are recognised

All users should cross-check which removable device is to be written by examining the manufacturer ID, partition size, filesystem type (FAT 32) reported by the Operating System

Writing ISO Files

  1. this procedure can be achieved via GUI tools
    • it shoulc suceed with all dotISO files, provided that those are bootable images
  2. obtain and install a suitable program
    • unetbootin is one of the better known
  3. ensure that the USB/SD media to be used is formatted FAT 32
  4. as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
    • including scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
  5. launch unetbootin
    • locate the downloaded dotISO file on hard disk
    • select the USB/SD media to be written
    • click OK

Strictly for Geeks

SD Cards

If an SD card is to be re-used then the following preparation should be followed

  1. attach the card to a Linux PC via a card reader
  2. use # lsblk
    • to identify the device as sd(x)
  3. run # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sd(x) bs=1M count=8
    • to zero the first 8M
    • this is the notional "first cylinder" used by Windows devices and to which they might store filesystem metadata

Experienced users tend to use "dd" to write ISO images to SD cards

  • SD cards use very large block sizes and will write slowly with the common 4 kiB block size
  • small block sizes might also cause unnecessary write cycle - the mortal enemy of flash memory devices

Therefore run # dd if=<path to ISO image> of=/dev/sd(x) bs=4M

  • to write the image.

Using/Creating ISOhybrid Files

This task is for intermediate/advanced users

Overview

Some dotISO files are now being provided as "ISOhybrids"

  • which have the main advantage of typically booting much faster from USB/SD devices
    • because most OS use conservative settings to boot USB/SD devices, in order to cope with older/buggy BIOS
  • boot speed is also highly dependent on the "Class" of SD media and (probably) unstated/indeterminate grade of USB "thumbdrive"

ISOhybrids may also be burnt to conventional CD/DVD/Bluray optical media, or written to USB/SD media, as in general/intermediate procedures above

  • hence the "hybrid" descriptor
  • but require the alternative procedure below to achieve faster performance from USB/SD devices

Hybridisation

  1. this procedure may be skipped, if the ISO is known to already be hybridised
  2. dotISO of unknown type may safely be converted to hybridISO via the program "isohybrid"
    • the conversion adds a few tens of kB, if the ISO is not already hybridised
      • which may push the ISO beyond the maximum capacity of optical media
      • alhough these ISOhybrids could still be written to USB/SD media, as in intermediate procedures above, or advanced precedures following.
    • it makes no perceptable difference if the ISO is already hybridised


execise great caution with the following procedure - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten

Writing ISOhybrids

  1. as a precaution, disconnect all other USB devices from the computer
    • including printers, scanners, mobile broadband sticks, modems etc
      • any of which could include "storage"
  2. verify the drive letter/number of the USB/SD media
    • in Windows use "Computer" menu and open the drive
    • in other OS use "My Computer", hdparm, fdisk etc
    • check by manufacturer ID, size, partitioning etc
  3. the partitioning/format of the USB/SD media to be used is probably immaterial
    • if in doubt, format the single/first partition as FAT 32
  4. launch a program for direct writing disk images of storage media eg
  5. more detailed instructions are at:

http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Live_USB_stick#Bootable_USB_from_DVD_or_Net-install

execise great caution with the above programs - an error in selecting the USB/SD device could result in hard disk partition being overwritten

Booting from Media

Booting from Removable Media


--Rpeters 12:09, 24 August 2012 (EST) --